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ADHD Summer Camp Programs



Looking for a summer camp or summer program for your child? Here is a list of several summer options for children, teens and young adults with ADHD.

ADHD Summer Camps and Programs

Achievement Center
ADHD Summer Treatment Program for kids age 6 to 12.
Website: achievementctr.org
Contact: Mary McIntosh
Phone: 814-459-2755
Locations: Erie and Edinboro, Pennsylvania

Alternative Community Resource Program
Summer program for children and teens age 5 to 16 with ADHD.
Website: acrpkids.org
Contact: Frank Janakovik
Phone: 888-308-6783
Location: Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Brewster Academy
With academics, technology, adventure, arts, and leadership all rolled into one program, the Summer Session at Brewster Academy is both a school and an adventure. It’s setting on the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee offers an ideal environment for this small, intensive camp/school open to students ages 12 to 18.
Website: brewsteracademy.org
Email: summer@brewsteracademy.org
Phone: 603-569-7155
Location: Wolfeboro, New Hampshire

Camp Buckskin
Camp Buckskin is an overnight summer camp that specializes in serving children ages 6 to 18 who are experiencing social skill and academic difficulties. The majority of campers have a primary diagnosis of ADHD, learning disabilities, or Asperger’s while others may have a secondary or related diagnosis.

In addition, a significant number of campers are adopted.
Website: campbuckskin.com
Email: info@campbuckskin.com
Phone: 763-208-4805
Location: Ely, Minnesota

Camp Discovery
An outdoor day camp for children ages 3 to 10 with mild to moderate special needs which vary in range from ADHD, autism, Asperger’s, developmental delays, etc.

Website: campdiscoveryla.org
Email: dawn@campdiscoveryla.org
Phone: 818-501-5522
Location: Encino, California

Camp Excel
A specialized program for children with ADHD or other social skills challenges. Camp Excel is a comprehensive program that includes academics to promote growth and avoid regression over the summer, therapeutic activities to assist in making and keeping friends, sports to develop skills and build self-esteem and recreational activities for fun. The summer program serves children ages 5 to 17. Camp Excel recognizes the importance of family involvement and offers weekly Parent Groups to provide parenting information and support. Siblings groups are also available and allow these children a safe place to express feelings regarding their special needs sibling.
Website: campexcel.com
Email: info@CampExcel.com
Phone: 732-281-0275
Location: Monmouth County and Bergen County in New Jersey

Camp Huntington
Camp Huntington is a co-ed, residential program for children and young adults age 6 to 21 years with special learning and developmental needs. They serve campers with learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, Asperger’s, and other special needs.
Website: camphuntington.com
Phone: 866-514-5281
Location: High Falls, New York

Camp Northwood
Camp Northwood specializes in working with non-aggressive children ranging in age from 8 to 18 diagnosed with Asperger’s, high-functioning autism, ADHD, language processing weaknesses and other forms of minimal learning issues. All of the campers experience delayed social development, weak executive functioning, and poor organizational skills.
Website: nwood.com
Email: northwoodprograms@hotmail.com
Phone: 315-831-3621
Location: Remsen, New York

Camp Nuhop
Camp Nuhop is a residential summer camp for children age 6 to 18 with learning disabilities, ADHD, and behavior disorders.
Website: campnuhop.org
Email: campnuhop@zoominternet.net
Phone: 419-289-2227
Location: Perrysville, Ohio

Camp Ramapo
Camp Ramapo is designed for children ages 4 to 16 who are having difficulty building and maintaining healthy relationships with peers and adults. Campers are referred by parents, teachers, and mental health professionals.
Website: ramapoforchildren.org 
Email: office@ramapoforchildren.org
Phone: 845-876-8423
Location: Rhinebeck, New York

Camp Sequoia
Camp Sequoia is an overnight summer camp for children ages 8-17 who need developing their social skills.
Website: camp-sequoia.com
Email: office@camp-sequoia.com
Phone: 610-771-0111
Location: Pottstown, Pennsylvania

Camp Star – University of Illinois at Chicago/JCYS North Shore Day Camp
Serves children ranging in age from 6 to 12. Many campers have a diagnosis of ADHD. Others have a diagnosis of oppositional defiant disorder, high-functioning autism or Asperger’s. Some may not have a formal diagnosis.
Website: jcys.org
Email: campstar@jcys.org
Phone: 847-814-STAR (7827)
Location: Chicago, Illinois

Celebrate ADHD – Friendship Camp
Friendship Camp summer day program offers children with ADHD a small and personalized setting to enjoy fun activities and build confidence and social skills. For children age 5 through 16. The camp also provides parent support and education.
Website: celebrate-adhd.com 
Contact: Kirk Martin
Email: kirk@celebratecalm.com
Location: Ashburn, Virginia

Charis Hills
Charis Hills is a Christian summer camp for kids and young adults age 7 to 25 with learning and social difficulties such as ADHD and Asperger’s disorder.
Website: charishills.org
Email: info@charishills.org
Phone: 888-681-2173
Location: Sunset, Texas

Child Development Center-University of California Irvine
The Child Development Center is a school specialized in the treatment of children with ADHD and related behavioral and learning problems. They offer a summer school program for children grades K through 6th.
Email: cdc@uci.edu
Phone: 949-824-2343
Location: Irvine, California

Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital
Summer Treatment Program for children with ADHD ages 6 to 14.
Website: my.clevelandclinic.org
Contact: Michael Manos, PhD
Phone: 216-444-0075
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Community Guidance Center

An eight-week intensive summer program for children and adolescents ages 6 through 15 who have a diagnosis of ADHD, oppositional disorder or conduct disorder.
Website: thecgc.com
Phone: 724-465-5576
Location: Indiana University, Pennsylvania

Diamond Summer Program
Formerly Simcha Special Day Camp, the Diamond Summer Program is an 8-week program for boys ages 6 to 12 with ADHD and other behavioral disorders.
Email: diamondsummerprogram@gmail.com
Phone: 718-406-1577
Location: Far Rockaway, New York

Duke University ADHD Program
Academic Summer Program for rising 6th to 8th graders with ADHD. The program uses evidence–based techniques to teach study strategies, academic support skills, and cooperative learning activities in a classroom environment with a 1:4 ratio. Two parent education workshops focusing on academic support for adolescents with ADHD are offered during one evening each week of the program.
Website: 2.mc.duke.edu/adhdprogram
Email: Michelle.Lepsch-Halligan@duke.edu
Phone: 919-416-2096
Location: Durham, North Carolina

Eagle Hill School (Connecticut)
The summer academic day program at Eagle Hill School is designed for children experiencing academic difficulty. Open to boys and girls ages 6 to 12. The Summer Program immerses youngsters in a total language environment specifically tailored to meet his or her needs.
Website: eaglehillschool.org
Email: t.cone@eaglehill.org
Phone: 203- 622-9240
Location: Greenwich, Connecticut

Eagle Hill School (Massachusetts)
Eagle Hill runs a five-week summer session for students ages 10 to 18 who have been diagnosed with specific learning disabilities and/or ADHD.
Website: ehs1.org
Phone: 413-477-6000
Location: Hardwick, Massachusetts

Frontier Travel Camp
A summer camp alternative for teens and adults with special needs. Group travel allows campers to experience independence, improve social skills, and increase self-esteem in a secure and exciting environment. Frontier travelers range in age from 15 to 35 years.
Website: frontiertravelcamp.com
Email: info@frontiertravelcamp.com
Phone: 305-895-1123
Location: Miami Shores, Florida with travel across the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Alaska and Europe

The Gow School
The Gow School offers a traditional summer school program experience for boys and girls ages 8 to 16. The 5-week session offers a specially designed curriculum for students who have experienced academic difficulties or have language-based learning disabilities, including dyslexia, central auditory processing disorder, and ADHD. Summer Program participants can be day students or live on campus.
Website: gow.org
Email: summer@gow.org
Phone: 716-652-3450
Location: South Wales, New York

Grand River Academy Summer Program
Grand River Summer Academy is for boys and girls entering 9 through 12 grades. During the six-week summer program, 5- and 7-day boarding students can strengthen an academic area or investigate a new subject.
Website: grandriver.org
Email: admissions@grandriver.org
Phone: 440-275-2811
Location: Austinburg, Ohio

Hill Center
The Hill Center’s Academic Summer Program is designed for students with learning disabilities or ADHD in grades K through 8th. Provides daily instruction in reading, written language, and math in a 4:1 student-teacher ratio.
Website: hillcenter.org
Email: wspeir@hillcenter.org
Phone: 919-489-7464, ext. 725
Location: Durham, North Carolina

Hillside School Summer Term
A structured, supportive and challenging summer experience for traditional and non-traditional learners (boys and girls) ages 9 to 16 who may enroll in the day or boarding program.
Website: hillsideschool.net
Email: admissions@hillsideschool.net
Phone: 508-485-2824
Location: Marlborough, Massachusetts

Judge Baker’s Children’s Center
Summer Treatment Program is for children ages 6 to 12 with behavioral, emotional and learning problems.
Website: jbcc.harvard.edu
Phone: 617-278-4261
Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Jump Start Summer Camp – James Madison University
Attention and Learning Disability Clinic. Jumpstart is a summer day camp designed to help rising 4th through 9th-grade students with ADHD build social and academic success.
Website: chp.cisat.jmu.edu
Phone: 540-568-6484
Location: Harrisonburg, Virginia

Kentwood Preparatory Summer Program
The Kentwood Summer Camp Program is a branch of Kentwood Preparatory School, a school program catering toward children, teens, and their families who are not being successful in the traditional school environments, socially, and/or at home. For children and teens grade K through 12. Camp Addington is the overnight camp of Kentwood’s summer programs.
Website: kentwoodprepcommunity.com
Email: info@kentwoodprepcommunity.com
Phone: 954-581-8222 or 954-634-0601
Location: Davie, Florida

Landmark College
Landmark College is one of the only accredited colleges in the U.S. designed exclusively for students with dyslexia, ADHD, or other specific learning disabilities. Summer programs include a high school program for rising juniors and seniors, the transition to college program for the college-bound high school graduate, and summer session for visiting college students.
Website: landmark.edu
Email: admissions@landmark.edu
Phone: 802-387-6718
Location: Putney,Vermont

The Learning Camp
The Learning Camp is specifically for kids with learning disabilities such as ADHD, dyslexia, and other LD challenges. The program provides traditional summer camp adventures for boys and girls ages 7 to 14 combined with carefully designed academic programs. Their mission is helping kids with learning disabilities build self-esteem, independence, and academic success.
Website: learningcamp.com
Email: information@learningcamp.com
Phone: 970-524-2706
Location: Vail, Colorado

Leelanau School Summer Session
Summer Academy and Ned Hallowell Summer Enrichment Camp for students grade 9 through 12.
Website: leelanau.org
Email: info@leelanau.org
Phone: 800-533-5262
Location: Glen Arbor, Michigan

Maplebrook School

Maplebrook School is a coeducational boarding and day school for students with learning differences and/or ADHD. Summer programs are available for children age 10 to 15. Activities include camping trips, canoeing, ropes courses, sports, arts, music and academic remediation. A vocational and independent living program for students age 16 and older is also available. This program allows older students to learn and earn by providing career counseling accompanied by experiential work internships. With guidance, students not only discover emerging career interests, but gain valuable workplace experience.
Website: maplebrookschool.org
Email: admissions@maplebrookschool.org
Phone: 845-373-8191
Location: Amenia, New York

North Carolina Summer Program for Kids
A highly structured, fun, and supportive summer day camp program for 7 to 12-year-olds with ADHD. The NC Summer Program for Kids brings together the expertise of two area leaders in helping families with AD/HD: the AD/HD Clinic at the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG) and Noble Academy.
Website: ncsummerprogramforkids.org 
Contact: Dr. Jennifer Sommer
Phone: (336) 346-3192, extension 304
Location: Greensboro, North Carolina

NYU Summer Program for Kids
The NYU Summer Program for Kids is an eight-week therapeutic clinical program devoted exclusively to children with ADHD who are between the ages of 7 to 11 years old. The program is specifically designed to improve children’s social behavior, friendship skills, academic competence, problem-solving skills, self-esteem, classroom behavior, sports competence, rule following, home behavior, and anger control. Parents are also taught specialized parenting skills to enhance parent-child relations.
Website: aboutourkids.org
Phone: 212-263-0760
Location: Bronx, New York

Oak Creek Ranch School
Oak Creek Ranch School’s Summer School program combines academics and outdoor activities designed to help pre-teens and teenagers with ADHD or academic underachievement discover their true potential. For students ages 12 to 19.
Website: ocrs.com 
Email: dwick@ocrs.com
Phone: 877-554-6277
Location: West Sedona, Arizona

Our Victory Day Camp
Our Victory serves children age 5 to 12 with learning disabilities and/or ADHD. Campers over age 12 who were previously enrolled may re-enroll until age 15 with the Director’s permission.
Website: ourvictory.com
Email: ourvictory@aol.com
Phone: 203-329-3394 or 914-674-4841
Location: Dobbs Ferry, New York

Quest Therapeutic Camp
Campers range from 6 to 18 years of age and experience mild to moderate difficulties behaviorally, emotionally or socially. Quest campers may struggle finding stable relationships or consistently achieving their goals. They may have diagnoses of ADHD, anxiety, Asperger’s, depression, learning disabilities or social problems.
Website: questcamps.com
Email: questcamps@mac.com
Phone: 925-743-1370
Location: Alamo, California

Round Lake Camp
A coed residential summer camp for children ages 7 to 21, a unique place for children with Asperger’s, ADHD, and mild social skill disorders. Educational activities are combined with recreation and socialization.
Website: roundlakecamp.org
Email: rlc@njycamps.org
Phone: 973-575-3333 x145 or 570-798-2551 x145
Location: Lakewood, Pennsylvania

SOAR
SOAR is a wilderness adventure program for youth with ADHD and learning disabilities and serves both males and females, ages 8 to 18. They offer programs in North Carolina, Wyoming, Florida, California, Costa Rica and Peru. SOAR utilizes the natural environment and adventure activities to work with students on personal goal attainment and to provide them with opportunities for success. SOAR encourages students to explore their incredible talents and gifts with the belief that their future is intertwined with these strengths and abilities.
Website: soarnc.org
Email: admissions@soarnc.org
Phone: 828-456-3435
Location: Camp programs available in North Carolina, Wyoming, Florida, California, Costa Rica, Belize, Peru

Staten Island Mental Health Society
Summer Therapeutic Program for children age 5 to 12.
Website: simhs.org
Phone: 718-442-2225
Location: West Brighton, New York

Summit Camp
Summit Camp provides a summer camp experience for boys and girls ages 7 to 17 who have issues of attention. These may include ADHD, Asperger’s syndrome, verbal or non-verbal learning disabilities, and/or mild social or emotional concerns. Some campers may also have Tourette’s syndrome, O.C.D., and/or mild mood issues.
Website: summitcamp.com
Email: info@summitcamp.com
Phone: 800-323-9908
Location: Honesdale, Pennsylvania

Summit Travel
Summit Travel represents the logical extension of the Summit camping program for teenagers age 15 to 19 who have outgrown the traditional camping experience, but still require opportunities for structured and supervised social experiences, and may need to transition to recreational opportunities of a more adult and “mainstream” nature. There are two 21-day trips and one 12-day mini trip. Either Trip One or Trip Two can be combined with a session at camp, which is recommended for “transitioning” campers. The 12-day trip can be a great introduction to travel for the first-time participant.
Website: summitcamp.com
Email: info@summitcamp.com
Phone: 800-323-9908
Travel Tour Locations: Check out the Summit website for current travel excursions.

Talisman Summer Camps and Programs
Talisman Programs offer summer camps and semester length programs for children ages 8 to 17 with learning disabilities, ADHD, Asperger’s, and high functioning autism. Talisman provides parents with unique alternatives to ordinary summer camps and offers children with special needs a summer full of fun, adventure, and new learning experiences.
Website: talismancamps.com
Email: info@talismancamps.com
Phone: 888-458-8226
Location: Zirconia, North Carolina

University of Alabama at Birmingham Sparks Clinics
Summer Treatment Program for children with behavioral disorders such as ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder.
Website: http://circ-uab.infomedia.com/
Contact: Bart Hodgens, PhD
Phone: 205-934-5471
Location: Birmingham, Alabama

University of Buffalo Center for Children and Families

The Center for Children and Families at the State University of New York at Buffalo offers comprehensive summer treatment programs for behavioral, emotional, and learning problems of children entering grades 1 to 6, as well as adolescents entering grades 7 to 11.The programs are composed of a set of evidence-based treatments incorporated into an 8-week therapeutic summer day camp setting. Parents participate in weekly group evening sessions that are designed to help parents develop skills to reduce problem behaviors, to improve their child’s task skills and relationships with parents and peers, and to maintain and extend the gains made in the summer program to the child’s natural at-home environment.
Website: ccf.buffalo.edu/STP.php
Phone: 716-829-2244
Location: Buffalo, New York

Winston Preparatory School Summer Program
Winston Prep is a co-ed day school offering individualized education for 6th through 12th-grade students with learning differences including ADHD. The school offers a morning summer enrichment program to enhance academic skills.
Website: winstonprep.edu
Email: summer@winstonprep.edu (NY campus) and summerct@winstonprep.edu (CT campus)
Phone: 646-638-2705 (NY) and 203-229-0465 (CT)
Locations: New York, New York and Norwalk, Connecticut

CANADA

Camp Kennebec
A non-competitive inclusive summer residence camp for ADHD, learning disabilities, behavioral needs and autism. Focusing on life and social skills for youth and young adults.
Website: campkennebec.com
Email: info@campkennebec.com
Phone: 877-335-2114
Location: Arden, Ontario

Camp Kirk
Camp Kirk is a small and friendly residential (overnight) summer camp that welcomes boys and girls age 6 to 13 with ADHD, learning disabilities, and autism.
Website: campkirk.com
Email: campkirk@campkirk.com
Phone: 866-982-3310
Location: Kirkfield, Ontario

Camp Kodiak
Sports, drama and socializing are more difficult for some children and teens than others. Camp Kodiak provides a unique program integrating ADHD, and LD children and teens age 6 to 18 with regular mainstream campers for an exciting and enriching summer experience.
Website: campkodiak.com 
Email: info@campkodiak.com
Phone: 877-569-7595
Location: Mississauga, Ontario

Club Kodiak
A vacation experience for young adults with ADHD, LD, Aspergers age 19+ in a safe, structured, nurturing environment.
Website: campkodiak.com/club
Email: club@campkodiak.com
Phone: 877-569-7595
Location: Mississauga, Ontario

Camp Towhee
Camp Towhee is a therapeutic residential program for children and adolescents age 10 to 18 years with learning disabilities who experience social, emotional and behavioral problems.
Website: camptowhee.ca
Email: info@camptowhee.ca
Phone: 800-839-3950
Location: Haliburton, Ontario

Camp Winston
Camp Winston provides residential summer camp programs for children with ADHD, learning disabilities, Tourettes, autism, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. For campers age 6 through 17 years.
Website: campwinston.com
Email: mail@campwinston.com
Phone: 416-487-6229 or 705-689-9096
Location: Kilworthy, Ontario

 

 

2018Repost from www.verywellmind.com

Behaviors that might suggest a teenager is experiencing difficulties



Parents often worry about their teens behavior. It is the norm for teenagers to sometimes appear withdrawn and moody and in their own world, but this shouldn’t last for a long time or interfere with their functioning.

We all have needs, such as feeling safe, liked, understood, and supported and they show up in different ways. There are times, however, when mental health issues can arise when things don’t seem to be going as expected. Your child may be experiencing lack of confidence, anxiety, perhaps even being bullied. Talk to them and help them express their feelings and come up with solutions.

The following is a list of behaviors that might suggest a teenager is experiencing difficulties.

If you are concerned about any of them, talk to your child and get professional help.

  • Becoming withdrawn and losing interest in friends, sports or favorite activities.
  • Having changes in sleep patterns such as not sleeping or sleeping for long periods.
  • Avoiding food, overeating or exercising excessively.
  • Seeming to be preoccupied or obsessed over a particular issue.
  • Having a change in mood such as becoming hostile or having feelings of anxiety or depression.
  • Having a sudden drop in schoolwork.
  • Doing things that don’t make sense to others.
  • Seeing or hearing things that nobody else sees or hears.
  • Being excessively tired or neglecting personal hygiene.
  • Wearing long sleeve clothes in hot weather. It may suggest they are hiding signs of self-harm.

I can say this instead…



 

Instead of …                                     Try thinking…

 

– I’m not good at this                          – What am I missing?

 

– I’m awesome at this                         – I’m on the right track

 

– I give up!                                           – I’ll use a different strategy

 

– This is too hard                                – This may take some time & effort

 

– I can’t do math                                – I’m going to train my brain in math

 

– I made a mistake                             – Mistakes help me improve

 

– Its’ good enough                            – Is this really my best work?

 

– They don’t like me                         – I don’t need anyone’s approval

 

– I’m too impulsive                          – I’m very spontaneous

 

 

 

 

3 Tips For Improving Your Child’s Sleep



Child sleepingMany children experience sleep related problems at least a few nights per week. Lack of sleep affects children physically, emotionally and academically.

Here are 3 essential tips to help your child get a better nights sleep.

 

1. Establish a routine – Regular sleep times are an important feature of creating desirable sleep behavior. A regular bedtime and wakeup time should be established and consistently followed.

  • Make the last 30 minutes before bedtime a regular routine. Include activities such as dressing for bed, washing, and reading.li>
  • Keep the order and timing consistent each night (e.g., brush teeth, wash up, change into pajamas, read for 15 to 20 minutes, hug and kiss, say, “ok, it’s time to sleep. Goodnight.”).
  • Don’t include activities that might result in conflict (i.e. picking out clothes for school). Work these into a routine before bedtime.

2. Nutrition and Exercise– how you eat and exercise impacts the way you sleep.

  • Nutrition is important to sleep. In general, a well-balanced diet is related to good sleep. Certain vitamins and supplements may have positive effects on sleep. Talk to your doctor about treating sleep problems via diet and supplements.
  • Exercise can also have a positive effect on sleep. Regular exercise during the day can help promote better sleep. Discourage vigorous activity right before bedtime.

3. The Setting – Turn the bedroom into a sleep inducing environment. Get your child involved in creating an environment that feels best for them.

  • The bed should be associated with relaxation. Try to minimize your child’s playing, jumping, wrestling, eating or homework on the bed.
  • Environmental factors such as light, temperature, comfort and noise should be optimized for sleep. (not too light or dark, hot or cold, or noisy, etc.) Black out curtains, comfy pillows, white noise, tranquil music and aromatherapy can help create a relaxing environment.
  • Some children feel more relaxed, grounded and safe with a heavier or weighted comforter due to the pressure of the touch.

 

Things to Avoid:

  • Avoid watching TV and using electronic devices close to bedtime because it can interfere with sleep.
  • Avoid vigorous activity and unpleasant situations right before bedtime.
  • Avoid extending the time for bedtime – don’t give in to requests for just one more story, or one more drink of water.
  • Avoid caffeine– caffeine is a stimulant that can stay in the body up to 6 hours. In general, drinks and foods containing caffeine, including soft drinks and chocolate, should be avoided in the hours before bedtime.

If your child continues to have sleep difficulties, you may want to consult your physician.

Refusal Skills



text: Just Say No!Kids are exposed to negative influences and peer pressure on a daily basis. Saying “no” to risky situations can be difficult for youth. Situations such as saying “no” to drugs or alcohol or saying “no” to texting while driving or cheating during an exam or doing something dangerous or breaking the law. There are so many choices kids have to make.

Encourage your child to develop and practice methods of saying “No”. Remind them to speak in a clear and firm manner and use confident body language to convey the message.

Here are several ways they can get out of undesirable situations and say “NO” in a more subtle way.

  • Switching topics (No, but hey did you see what happened in the game last night?)
  • Excuse (I can’t. I have to meet a friend in 10 minutes.)
  • Blame (I have a stomachache  or that stuff makes me feel horrible.)
  • State the facts (No thanks- I’ve read about what drugs do to your body.)
  • Give a friend a compliment that might make them think twice about their own risky decision (You’re so smart. Don’t risk hurting yourself.)
  • or, Just say “No”

How to talk to your child about terrorism



In lieu of the Paris terrorist attacks, many parents may have questions on how to talk to their children about violence and terrorism. The challenge lies in helping your child feel secure while trying to explain complex and disturbing situations.

It is natural for parents to want to spare children the details about terrorism. Unfortunately, children are exposed to violence in today’s world at a very early age and must learn to cope with these tough issues.

As a parent, you have an opportunity to talk with your child and provide answers to any questions that they may have, as well as lifting the burden of facing their fears and uncertainty alone.

Your child’s age, maturity and personality will influence their questions and your responses.

 

Here are some tips on getting started:

 

1. Take time to talk to your child and listen to their thoughts and concerns.

Ask your child what they have heard and how they feel about it? Don’t force your child to talk about things until they are ready. Assure them that you will be available for them, once they are.

 

2. Provide accurate information to any questions that your child may have.

Keep the explanations simple and age appropriate. If you do not know the answer, it’s ok to say that you don’t know and that you will let them know as soon as you find out.

 

3. Help your child express their feelings and concerns.

Some children are comfortable talking while others are more comfortable expressing themselves through playing with toys or drawing pictures. Do not dismiss their feelings and always provide them with a safe place to express themselves.

 

4. Assure your child that they are safe.

Explain to them that the government, the police and people all over the world are doing things to prevent this from happening again. Reassure them that they are safe and that you will always protect them.

 

5. Limit television and news exposure as well as adult conversations around your child.

These images and conversations can be very disturbing and cause distress to children. Be mindful to avoid stereotyping and prejudice. Use this opportunity to teach tolerance and explain prejudice.

 

6. Remind them that terrorism events are rare and that the world is generally a safe place.

Point out all the good things that happen on a daily basis and explain to them that these are isolated and rare events.

 

7. Look out for symptoms related to stress or anxiety

These symptoms may included difficulty sleeping, persistent upsetting thoughts, intense fears, and difficulty separating from parents or going to school as well as physical complaints. Professional help may be needed if your child shows signs of distress.

5 Tips for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities



Having a learning difference means your child is struggling with skills such as reading, writing, listening, speaking, reasoning or solving math problems. A learning disability does not imply a deficit in intelligence. In fact, most children diagnosed with learning disabilities have average or above average intelligence, they just learn in a different manner.

 

Here are five tips for parents to keep in mind:

 

  1. Find out what your child’s challenges and strengths are. Have your child evaluated to gain a better understanding about the whole child. Make sure you have a clear understanding of your child’s areas of strengths and difficulties. Share this information with your child. Encourage them to use their strengths and assure them that together, you will create tools to overcome their challenges.

 

  1. Find support. Talk to your child’s teacher and school to find out what type of support, remediation and expectations they have. If you cannot find adequate support at school, then you may need to find it outside of school with other parents, groups and professionals who can share learning tips and strategies for kids with learning difficulties.

 

  1. Have reasonable expectations. Know your child’s capabilities and when to push and when to stop. Keep things in perspective. Academics are important but your child’s emotional health and ability to find solutions to daily struggles is even more important. Learning is a lifelong experience; it should be enjoyable.

 

  1. Discover your child’s preferred learning style. Is your child a visual, auditory or kinesthetic learner? Presenting the information in your child’s preferred learning style will allow them to learn and process the way they learn best.

 

  1. Keep the lines of communication open with your child. Take time to listen to your child’s concerns and accomplishments. Remain positive and curious and above all become their biggest cheerleader. As a parent, your support and understanding really matters.

Back To School Stress Busters



A new school year can be an exciting, yet stressful time in your child’s life.
Numerous thoughts cross their minds about the Welcome backpossibilities that await them, both academically and socially. For parents, there are stressors too, such as adjusting to schedules, additional demands and having your child out of your care. As a family, this is a great opportunity to strengthen your connection as you support each other through this journey. Here are some tips to help you manage the stress:

1. Talk about their school day everyday. Ask questions and really listen. Sometimes, your child may want help brainstorming solutions to a situation and other times they may just want you to listen. During this time give your child your undivided attention. Also remember to share their enthusiasm for all the good things that they experienced.

2. Make sure your child has at least 8-10 hours sleep and all the electronics, including TV are shut off 30 minutes prior to bedtime. Mornings can be easy by creating a morning routine, having them set out their clothes or uniforms, getting backpacks ready and breakfast chosen the night before goes a long way.

3. The best way to immediately tone down your stress level is a few deep breaths. The breath is best inhaled through the nose and exhaled through the mouth. Try this as soon as you feel a stressor.

4. Have your child develop a new mantra “I’ve got this.” This mantra will be useful every time they feel uncertain about something. It is used as a simple reminder that it’s ok, they are going to be fine, they can do it! So, before that test that they studied for- “I’ve got this” – before they go talk to that new someone – “I’ve got this”.

5. Social concerns are high for kids. Remind them that not everyone is going to see eye to eye with them and may not even like them and that’s OK! We are all unique and special and the most important thing is that we like ourselves and are nice and respectful to others. Encourage your child to find a group of friends that they feel comfortable with and remind them that over time they can always choose to develop more friendships.

Prevent the Summer Math Slide



Summer is half way through and as your child gets ready to go back to school in September, it might be a good idea to help them sharpen their math skills.

During summer, kids often forget math computational skills that they learned the previous year. So, it’s a good time to help them regain their memory.

Here are a few tips on how to weave some fun into a math review:

Problem Solving:

Have your child solve everyday math problems, such as:

  • If each candy bar costs $1.29 then how much do 3 candy bars cost?
  • How old will I be when you turn 18?
  • How old will you be in the year 2050?
  • If I were to give you $50 to spend and you had to buy two gifts, one for $15 and the other for $22, then how much money would you have left over?

Money:

  • Count the money in the piggy bank
  • Write out fake checks
  • Make towers of quarters and dimes and guess how much money there is in each tower
  • Let them pay and check the change wherever you go

Math Facts:

  • Ask them the times tables on a random car ride and offer a treat (maybe ice cream) if they get them mostly right
  • Use pizzas, pies, cookies and cakes to review fractions
  • Get a math facts placemat for the dinner table

Digital Practice:

  • Mathisfun.com
  • Fun4thebrain.com
  • Maths Bingo app
  • Virtual Manipulatives app

Kinesthetic Learners:

  • Use clay or Legos
  • Use sand and water to demonstrate volume
  • Use grapes, oranges or any other fruit or vegetable to count, divide or multiply

And of course, there’s the old lemonade stand, which will help your child boost mathematical, measuring and money management skills.

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All is takes is a few minutes everyday to practice math facts to ensure an easy transition into the next school year. Start today.

 

 

Teens “Hooking Up”



Romantic KissHooking up is a trend amongst teens that means “some sort of sexual activity with no strings attached.”  It is like “friends with benefits.” It can include anything from kissing and petting all the way to intercourse. It bypasses all the courting rituals and end eliminates the boyfriend and girlfriend relationship.

Research conducted by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that the likelihood of sex increases with each school grade level, from 32 percent in 9th grade to 62 percent in 12th grade.

So why are teens doing this? Basically, because they like someone, they think it’s ok and everyone else is doing it too. So it comes down to sexual excitement and peer acceptance.  This is fueled by all the media sources portraying sexual provocative images that socialize teens to think of sexual activity as normative. In addition, dating apps such as Tinder make it easy for teens to match up with other teens for sexual relations.

So what do you do as a parent?

First, get informed and develop an on-going, open communication with your teen. Explain to them that sexual activity can have physical and emotional consequences. Most teens don’t think about the emotional consequences. Have an open discussion without getting angry or punitive.

Then, don’t assume your teen is not having sex. Ask. Sex can mean different things to a teen. “Oral sex” may not be considered sex by many teens. Make sure they understand what you mean when you talk about sex. Listen to what they have to say.

Teens “hook up” to feel wanted and fit in as part of what has become socially acceptable by their peer group. It is important to know who your teen’s peer group is and what they are doing and where they are doing it. The most common time and place for teen sex is after school in someone’s house.

Even though it is uncomfortable for many parents to have this conversation with their teen, it actually helps strengthen your relationship.  Ideally the conversation should begin before your child becomes sexually active in any way. Regardless, having insight in your teen’s social life and keeping the communication lines open by listening to them and asking questions is the best way to protect them, both physically and emotionally.