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Topics for the ‘ADHD’ Category

 

ADHD Summer Camp Programs



Looking for a summer camp or summer program for your child? Here is a list of several summer options for children, teens and young adults with ADHD.

ADHD Summer Camps and Programs

Achievement Center
ADHD Summer Treatment Program for kids age 6 to 12.
Website: achievementctr.org
Contact: Mary McIntosh
Phone: 814-459-2755
Locations: Erie and Edinboro, Pennsylvania

Alternative Community Resource Program
Summer program for children and teens age 5 to 16 with ADHD.
Website: acrpkids.org
Contact: Frank Janakovik
Phone: 888-308-6783
Location: Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Brewster Academy
With academics, technology, adventure, arts, and leadership all rolled into one program, the Summer Session at Brewster Academy is both a school and an adventure. It’s setting on the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee offers an ideal environment for this small, intensive camp/school open to students ages 12 to 18.
Website: brewsteracademy.org
Email: summer@brewsteracademy.org
Phone: 603-569-7155
Location: Wolfeboro, New Hampshire

Camp Buckskin
Camp Buckskin is an overnight summer camp that specializes in serving children ages 6 to 18 who are experiencing social skill and academic difficulties. The majority of campers have a primary diagnosis of ADHD, learning disabilities, or Asperger’s while others may have a secondary or related diagnosis.

In addition, a significant number of campers are adopted.
Website: campbuckskin.com
Email: info@campbuckskin.com
Phone: 763-208-4805
Location: Ely, Minnesota

Camp Discovery
An outdoor day camp for children ages 3 to 10 with mild to moderate special needs which vary in range from ADHD, autism, Asperger’s, developmental delays, etc.

Website: campdiscoveryla.org
Email: dawn@campdiscoveryla.org
Phone: 818-501-5522
Location: Encino, California

Camp Excel
A specialized program for children with ADHD or other social skills challenges. Camp Excel is a comprehensive program that includes academics to promote growth and avoid regression over the summer, therapeutic activities to assist in making and keeping friends, sports to develop skills and build self-esteem and recreational activities for fun. The summer program serves children ages 5 to 17. Camp Excel recognizes the importance of family involvement and offers weekly Parent Groups to provide parenting information and support. Siblings groups are also available and allow these children a safe place to express feelings regarding their special needs sibling.
Website: campexcel.com
Email: info@CampExcel.com
Phone: 732-281-0275
Location: Monmouth County and Bergen County in New Jersey

Camp Huntington
Camp Huntington is a co-ed, residential program for children and young adults age 6 to 21 years with special learning and developmental needs. They serve campers with learning disabilities, ADHD, autism, Asperger’s, and other special needs.
Website: camphuntington.com
Phone: 866-514-5281
Location: High Falls, New York

Camp Northwood
Camp Northwood specializes in working with non-aggressive children ranging in age from 8 to 18 diagnosed with Asperger’s, high-functioning autism, ADHD, language processing weaknesses and other forms of minimal learning issues. All of the campers experience delayed social development, weak executive functioning, and poor organizational skills.
Website: nwood.com
Email: northwoodprograms@hotmail.com
Phone: 315-831-3621
Location: Remsen, New York

Camp Nuhop
Camp Nuhop is a residential summer camp for children age 6 to 18 with learning disabilities, ADHD, and behavior disorders.
Website: campnuhop.org
Email: campnuhop@zoominternet.net
Phone: 419-289-2227
Location: Perrysville, Ohio

Camp Ramapo
Camp Ramapo is designed for children ages 4 to 16 who are having difficulty building and maintaining healthy relationships with peers and adults. Campers are referred by parents, teachers, and mental health professionals.
Website: ramapoforchildren.org 
Email: office@ramapoforchildren.org
Phone: 845-876-8423
Location: Rhinebeck, New York

Camp Sequoia
Camp Sequoia is an overnight summer camp for children ages 8-17 who need developing their social skills.
Website: camp-sequoia.com
Email: office@camp-sequoia.com
Phone: 610-771-0111
Location: Pottstown, Pennsylvania

Camp Star – University of Illinois at Chicago/JCYS North Shore Day Camp
Serves children ranging in age from 6 to 12. Many campers have a diagnosis of ADHD. Others have a diagnosis of oppositional defiant disorder, high-functioning autism or Asperger’s. Some may not have a formal diagnosis.
Website: jcys.org
Email: campstar@jcys.org
Phone: 847-814-STAR (7827)
Location: Chicago, Illinois

Celebrate ADHD – Friendship Camp
Friendship Camp summer day program offers children with ADHD a small and personalized setting to enjoy fun activities and build confidence and social skills. For children age 5 through 16. The camp also provides parent support and education.
Website: celebrate-adhd.com 
Contact: Kirk Martin
Email: kirk@celebratecalm.com
Location: Ashburn, Virginia

Charis Hills
Charis Hills is a Christian summer camp for kids and young adults age 7 to 25 with learning and social difficulties such as ADHD and Asperger’s disorder.
Website: charishills.org
Email: info@charishills.org
Phone: 888-681-2173
Location: Sunset, Texas

Child Development Center-University of California Irvine
The Child Development Center is a school specialized in the treatment of children with ADHD and related behavioral and learning problems. They offer a summer school program for children grades K through 6th.
Email: cdc@uci.edu
Phone: 949-824-2343
Location: Irvine, California

Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital
Summer Treatment Program for children with ADHD ages 6 to 14.
Website: my.clevelandclinic.org
Contact: Michael Manos, PhD
Phone: 216-444-0075
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Community Guidance Center

An eight-week intensive summer program for children and adolescents ages 6 through 15 who have a diagnosis of ADHD, oppositional disorder or conduct disorder.
Website: thecgc.com
Phone: 724-465-5576
Location: Indiana University, Pennsylvania

Diamond Summer Program
Formerly Simcha Special Day Camp, the Diamond Summer Program is an 8-week program for boys ages 6 to 12 with ADHD and other behavioral disorders.
Email: diamondsummerprogram@gmail.com
Phone: 718-406-1577
Location: Far Rockaway, New York

Duke University ADHD Program
Academic Summer Program for rising 6th to 8th graders with ADHD. The program uses evidence–based techniques to teach study strategies, academic support skills, and cooperative learning activities in a classroom environment with a 1:4 ratio. Two parent education workshops focusing on academic support for adolescents with ADHD are offered during one evening each week of the program.
Website: 2.mc.duke.edu/adhdprogram
Email: Michelle.Lepsch-Halligan@duke.edu
Phone: 919-416-2096
Location: Durham, North Carolina

Eagle Hill School (Connecticut)
The summer academic day program at Eagle Hill School is designed for children experiencing academic difficulty. Open to boys and girls ages 6 to 12. The Summer Program immerses youngsters in a total language environment specifically tailored to meet his or her needs.
Website: eaglehillschool.org
Email: t.cone@eaglehill.org
Phone: 203- 622-9240
Location: Greenwich, Connecticut

Eagle Hill School (Massachusetts)
Eagle Hill runs a five-week summer session for students ages 10 to 18 who have been diagnosed with specific learning disabilities and/or ADHD.
Website: ehs1.org
Phone: 413-477-6000
Location: Hardwick, Massachusetts

Frontier Travel Camp
A summer camp alternative for teens and adults with special needs. Group travel allows campers to experience independence, improve social skills, and increase self-esteem in a secure and exciting environment. Frontier travelers range in age from 15 to 35 years.
Website: frontiertravelcamp.com
Email: info@frontiertravelcamp.com
Phone: 305-895-1123
Location: Miami Shores, Florida with travel across the United States, Canada, Hawaii, Alaska and Europe

The Gow School
The Gow School offers a traditional summer school program experience for boys and girls ages 8 to 16. The 5-week session offers a specially designed curriculum for students who have experienced academic difficulties or have language-based learning disabilities, including dyslexia, central auditory processing disorder, and ADHD. Summer Program participants can be day students or live on campus.
Website: gow.org
Email: summer@gow.org
Phone: 716-652-3450
Location: South Wales, New York

Grand River Academy Summer Program
Grand River Summer Academy is for boys and girls entering 9 through 12 grades. During the six-week summer program, 5- and 7-day boarding students can strengthen an academic area or investigate a new subject.
Website: grandriver.org
Email: admissions@grandriver.org
Phone: 440-275-2811
Location: Austinburg, Ohio

Hill Center
The Hill Center’s Academic Summer Program is designed for students with learning disabilities or ADHD in grades K through 8th. Provides daily instruction in reading, written language, and math in a 4:1 student-teacher ratio.
Website: hillcenter.org
Email: wspeir@hillcenter.org
Phone: 919-489-7464, ext. 725
Location: Durham, North Carolina

Hillside School Summer Term
A structured, supportive and challenging summer experience for traditional and non-traditional learners (boys and girls) ages 9 to 16 who may enroll in the day or boarding program.
Website: hillsideschool.net
Email: admissions@hillsideschool.net
Phone: 508-485-2824
Location: Marlborough, Massachusetts

Judge Baker’s Children’s Center
Summer Treatment Program is for children ages 6 to 12 with behavioral, emotional and learning problems.
Website: jbcc.harvard.edu
Phone: 617-278-4261
Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Jump Start Summer Camp – James Madison University
Attention and Learning Disability Clinic. Jumpstart is a summer day camp designed to help rising 4th through 9th-grade students with ADHD build social and academic success.
Website: chp.cisat.jmu.edu
Phone: 540-568-6484
Location: Harrisonburg, Virginia

Kentwood Preparatory Summer Program
The Kentwood Summer Camp Program is a branch of Kentwood Preparatory School, a school program catering toward children, teens, and their families who are not being successful in the traditional school environments, socially, and/or at home. For children and teens grade K through 12. Camp Addington is the overnight camp of Kentwood’s summer programs.
Website: kentwoodprepcommunity.com
Email: info@kentwoodprepcommunity.com
Phone: 954-581-8222 or 954-634-0601
Location: Davie, Florida

Landmark College
Landmark College is one of the only accredited colleges in the U.S. designed exclusively for students with dyslexia, ADHD, or other specific learning disabilities. Summer programs include a high school program for rising juniors and seniors, the transition to college program for the college-bound high school graduate, and summer session for visiting college students.
Website: landmark.edu
Email: admissions@landmark.edu
Phone: 802-387-6718
Location: Putney,Vermont

The Learning Camp
The Learning Camp is specifically for kids with learning disabilities such as ADHD, dyslexia, and other LD challenges. The program provides traditional summer camp adventures for boys and girls ages 7 to 14 combined with carefully designed academic programs. Their mission is helping kids with learning disabilities build self-esteem, independence, and academic success.
Website: learningcamp.com
Email: information@learningcamp.com
Phone: 970-524-2706
Location: Vail, Colorado

Leelanau School Summer Session
Summer Academy and Ned Hallowell Summer Enrichment Camp for students grade 9 through 12.
Website: leelanau.org
Email: info@leelanau.org
Phone: 800-533-5262
Location: Glen Arbor, Michigan

Maplebrook School

Maplebrook School is a coeducational boarding and day school for students with learning differences and/or ADHD. Summer programs are available for children age 10 to 15. Activities include camping trips, canoeing, ropes courses, sports, arts, music and academic remediation. A vocational and independent living program for students age 16 and older is also available. This program allows older students to learn and earn by providing career counseling accompanied by experiential work internships. With guidance, students not only discover emerging career interests, but gain valuable workplace experience.
Website: maplebrookschool.org
Email: admissions@maplebrookschool.org
Phone: 845-373-8191
Location: Amenia, New York

North Carolina Summer Program for Kids
A highly structured, fun, and supportive summer day camp program for 7 to 12-year-olds with ADHD. The NC Summer Program for Kids brings together the expertise of two area leaders in helping families with AD/HD: the AD/HD Clinic at the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG) and Noble Academy.
Website: ncsummerprogramforkids.org 
Contact: Dr. Jennifer Sommer
Phone: (336) 346-3192, extension 304
Location: Greensboro, North Carolina

NYU Summer Program for Kids
The NYU Summer Program for Kids is an eight-week therapeutic clinical program devoted exclusively to children with ADHD who are between the ages of 7 to 11 years old. The program is specifically designed to improve children’s social behavior, friendship skills, academic competence, problem-solving skills, self-esteem, classroom behavior, sports competence, rule following, home behavior, and anger control. Parents are also taught specialized parenting skills to enhance parent-child relations.
Website: aboutourkids.org
Phone: 212-263-0760
Location: Bronx, New York

Oak Creek Ranch School
Oak Creek Ranch School’s Summer School program combines academics and outdoor activities designed to help pre-teens and teenagers with ADHD or academic underachievement discover their true potential. For students ages 12 to 19.
Website: ocrs.com 
Email: dwick@ocrs.com
Phone: 877-554-6277
Location: West Sedona, Arizona

Our Victory Day Camp
Our Victory serves children age 5 to 12 with learning disabilities and/or ADHD. Campers over age 12 who were previously enrolled may re-enroll until age 15 with the Director’s permission.
Website: ourvictory.com
Email: ourvictory@aol.com
Phone: 203-329-3394 or 914-674-4841
Location: Dobbs Ferry, New York

Quest Therapeutic Camp
Campers range from 6 to 18 years of age and experience mild to moderate difficulties behaviorally, emotionally or socially. Quest campers may struggle finding stable relationships or consistently achieving their goals. They may have diagnoses of ADHD, anxiety, Asperger’s, depression, learning disabilities or social problems.
Website: questcamps.com
Email: questcamps@mac.com
Phone: 925-743-1370
Location: Alamo, California

Round Lake Camp
A coed residential summer camp for children ages 7 to 21, a unique place for children with Asperger’s, ADHD, and mild social skill disorders. Educational activities are combined with recreation and socialization.
Website: roundlakecamp.org
Email: rlc@njycamps.org
Phone: 973-575-3333 x145 or 570-798-2551 x145
Location: Lakewood, Pennsylvania

SOAR
SOAR is a wilderness adventure program for youth with ADHD and learning disabilities and serves both males and females, ages 8 to 18. They offer programs in North Carolina, Wyoming, Florida, California, Costa Rica and Peru. SOAR utilizes the natural environment and adventure activities to work with students on personal goal attainment and to provide them with opportunities for success. SOAR encourages students to explore their incredible talents and gifts with the belief that their future is intertwined with these strengths and abilities.
Website: soarnc.org
Email: admissions@soarnc.org
Phone: 828-456-3435
Location: Camp programs available in North Carolina, Wyoming, Florida, California, Costa Rica, Belize, Peru

Staten Island Mental Health Society
Summer Therapeutic Program for children age 5 to 12.
Website: simhs.org
Phone: 718-442-2225
Location: West Brighton, New York

Summit Camp
Summit Camp provides a summer camp experience for boys and girls ages 7 to 17 who have issues of attention. These may include ADHD, Asperger’s syndrome, verbal or non-verbal learning disabilities, and/or mild social or emotional concerns. Some campers may also have Tourette’s syndrome, O.C.D., and/or mild mood issues.
Website: summitcamp.com
Email: info@summitcamp.com
Phone: 800-323-9908
Location: Honesdale, Pennsylvania

Summit Travel
Summit Travel represents the logical extension of the Summit camping program for teenagers age 15 to 19 who have outgrown the traditional camping experience, but still require opportunities for structured and supervised social experiences, and may need to transition to recreational opportunities of a more adult and “mainstream” nature. There are two 21-day trips and one 12-day mini trip. Either Trip One or Trip Two can be combined with a session at camp, which is recommended for “transitioning” campers. The 12-day trip can be a great introduction to travel for the first-time participant.
Website: summitcamp.com
Email: info@summitcamp.com
Phone: 800-323-9908
Travel Tour Locations: Check out the Summit website for current travel excursions.

Talisman Summer Camps and Programs
Talisman Programs offer summer camps and semester length programs for children ages 8 to 17 with learning disabilities, ADHD, Asperger’s, and high functioning autism. Talisman provides parents with unique alternatives to ordinary summer camps and offers children with special needs a summer full of fun, adventure, and new learning experiences.
Website: talismancamps.com
Email: info@talismancamps.com
Phone: 888-458-8226
Location: Zirconia, North Carolina

University of Alabama at Birmingham Sparks Clinics
Summer Treatment Program for children with behavioral disorders such as ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder.
Website: http://circ-uab.infomedia.com/
Contact: Bart Hodgens, PhD
Phone: 205-934-5471
Location: Birmingham, Alabama

University of Buffalo Center for Children and Families

The Center for Children and Families at the State University of New York at Buffalo offers comprehensive summer treatment programs for behavioral, emotional, and learning problems of children entering grades 1 to 6, as well as adolescents entering grades 7 to 11.The programs are composed of a set of evidence-based treatments incorporated into an 8-week therapeutic summer day camp setting. Parents participate in weekly group evening sessions that are designed to help parents develop skills to reduce problem behaviors, to improve their child’s task skills and relationships with parents and peers, and to maintain and extend the gains made in the summer program to the child’s natural at-home environment.
Website: ccf.buffalo.edu/STP.php
Phone: 716-829-2244
Location: Buffalo, New York

Winston Preparatory School Summer Program
Winston Prep is a co-ed day school offering individualized education for 6th through 12th-grade students with learning differences including ADHD. The school offers a morning summer enrichment program to enhance academic skills.
Website: winstonprep.edu
Email: summer@winstonprep.edu (NY campus) and summerct@winstonprep.edu (CT campus)
Phone: 646-638-2705 (NY) and 203-229-0465 (CT)
Locations: New York, New York and Norwalk, Connecticut

CANADA

Camp Kennebec
A non-competitive inclusive summer residence camp for ADHD, learning disabilities, behavioral needs and autism. Focusing on life and social skills for youth and young adults.
Website: campkennebec.com
Email: info@campkennebec.com
Phone: 877-335-2114
Location: Arden, Ontario

Camp Kirk
Camp Kirk is a small and friendly residential (overnight) summer camp that welcomes boys and girls age 6 to 13 with ADHD, learning disabilities, and autism.
Website: campkirk.com
Email: campkirk@campkirk.com
Phone: 866-982-3310
Location: Kirkfield, Ontario

Camp Kodiak
Sports, drama and socializing are more difficult for some children and teens than others. Camp Kodiak provides a unique program integrating ADHD, and LD children and teens age 6 to 18 with regular mainstream campers for an exciting and enriching summer experience.
Website: campkodiak.com 
Email: info@campkodiak.com
Phone: 877-569-7595
Location: Mississauga, Ontario

Club Kodiak
A vacation experience for young adults with ADHD, LD, Aspergers age 19+ in a safe, structured, nurturing environment.
Website: campkodiak.com/club
Email: club@campkodiak.com
Phone: 877-569-7595
Location: Mississauga, Ontario

Camp Towhee
Camp Towhee is a therapeutic residential program for children and adolescents age 10 to 18 years with learning disabilities who experience social, emotional and behavioral problems.
Website: camptowhee.ca
Email: info@camptowhee.ca
Phone: 800-839-3950
Location: Haliburton, Ontario

Camp Winston
Camp Winston provides residential summer camp programs for children with ADHD, learning disabilities, Tourettes, autism, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. For campers age 6 through 17 years.
Website: campwinston.com
Email: mail@campwinston.com
Phone: 416-487-6229 or 705-689-9096
Location: Kilworthy, Ontario

 

 

2018Repost from www.verywellmind.com

What is a psycho-educational assessment?



 

What is a Psycho-educational assessment?

 

A psycho-educational assessment provides estimates of the client’s intellectual, or cognitive, abilities and educational achievement levels. It also yields recommendations relevant for educational planning.

Sources of assessment data include background information, educational history, and records and data from tests of intelligence and educational achievement and, at times, ratings tests of attention, behavior/emotions, and adaptive behavior.

A psycho-educational assessment is designed to answer these questions: Does the client have a learning disability(ies)? Mental retardation? Attention problems? What are the client’s academic and cognitive abilities, strengths, and weaknesses? What are appropriate educational recommendations? Accommodations?

While learning, not emotional problems, is the focus of psycho-educational assessment, behavior/emotional and medical issues may need to be addressed in psycho-educational assessment. Compiling, integrating, and analyzing all assessment data yield educational and other relevant recommendations.

 

Components of a psycho-educational assessment include:

  •   Referral question(s)
    Referral source
    Background information
    Assessment procedures
    Relevant test procedures
    Assessment results
    Interpretation of results
    Summary and recommendations

An important part of the psycho-educational assessment is the educational recommendations section. In this section the clinician will make recommendations to help strengthen the areas of weakness. This may include suggestions for accommodations in the academic setting as well as additional support.

 

Intelligence Tests

Intelligence tests are commonly referred to as IQ tests. The most common IQ tests in current use are the Wechsler intelligence scales and Woodcock-Johnson.

The Wechsler scales yield:

  • Full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ): overall, composite measure of intelligence
  • Verbal IQ: estimate of verbal comprehension and expression
  • Performance IQ: estimate of visual-spatial reasoning.
  • In addition, there are supplementary indexes that include measures of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed (a measure of information-processing speed), and Working Memory (a measure of short-term memory and attention).

 

Woodcock Johnson Test also includes supplemental information that includes:

  • Auditory processing: discrimination, analysis, and synthesis of auditory stimuli; perception and discrimination of speech sounds despite interfering background noise
  • Phonemic awareness: manipulation, analysis, and synthesis of discrete sounds
  • Visual processing: (includes visual memory) perception, analysis, and synthesis of visual stimuli; storage and memory of visually presented stimuli; mental manipulation of visual patterns
  • Long-term retrieval/memory: storage and retention of information with ability to retrieve it at a later time.
  • Short-term memory: processing and holding auditory information in awareness, then manipulating it within a few seconds
  • Processing speed: rapid cognitive processing without higher order thinking; attentiveness and fluency of simple information processing
  • Verbal reasoning: reasoning and comprehension when using language, verbal expression, vocabulary
  • General information/knowledge: acquired knowledge, long-term memory
  • Fluid reasoning: inductive and deductive reasoning, problem solving, and concept formation on novel tasks that are nonverbal or limited in language demands
  • Quantitative ability: understanding mathematical concepts and relations.

In addition, often implicated in learning disabilities are the areas of auditory processing, phonemic awareness, processing speed, short-term memory, and long-term retrieval. Because traditional IQ tests yield measures of only some of the above abilities, a good psycho-educational assessment should supplement a traditional IQ measure, such as the Wechsler, with additional measures from the Woodcock-Johnson or other batteries.

 

Educational/Achievement Tests

Educational testing, typically referenced as achievement testing, is an important component of psycho-educational assessment. Assessment of achievement is an important part of assessment to rule out/diagnose learning disabilities and mental retardation. In addition, attention problems are often related to achievement problems. In most cases, poor achievement is what triggers the referral for assessment.

 

Learning disabilities

Learning disabilities are a pattern of scores representing unevenness in intellectual and academic abilities and skills. While all people have some strengths and weaknesses (e.g., stronger in quantitative than verbal skills), a person with learning disabilities has significant variability in both intellectual/cognitive abilities and related academic variability. The most common example is reading disabilities. These are usually associated with deficits in auditory processing, processing speed, and/or phonemic awareness; but the essential component is unexpectedly weak reading skills.

Federal law defines the seven areas of learning disability as

  • basic reading (includes phonetic decoding and sight word recognition)
  • reading comprehension
  • mathematics calculation
  • mathematics reasoning
  • written expression(includes basic writing skills, spelling, and composition)
  • oral expression
  • listening comprehension.

 

Giftedness

Each state and school district is required to develop and implement a system to identify students that are thought to be gifted and in need of specially designed instruction. Mentally gifted generally includes a person with an IQ score of at least 130, but gifted criteria is not based on IQ score alone.

 

Dual Exceptionalities

Dual exceptional, also known as twice exceptional applies to students that demonstrate both superior intellectual ability and specific learning problems or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These students do not fit neatly into the gifted or learning disability category and are often the most challenging for educators. It is important for educators to tend to both the giftedness and the disability.

 

Mental Retardation

Mental retardation is typically defined as significantly below average intellectual/cognitive functioning (approximately two standard deviations below the mean) and significantly weak adaptive behavior.

 

Measures of Adaptive Behavior

State and federal laws require that a measure of adaptive behavior (i.e., domestic, daily living, social and functional academic and communication skills) must be obtained in making a diagnosis of mental retardation.

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

There is no single test for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, there are several behavior ratings and tests of attention; most provide measures of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattentiveness. Parents and teachers will complete rating scales as part of the assessment. In addition, behavioral observations will be made by the clinician.

 

 

Note: Generally, a full scale IQ over 130 is considered gifted and an IQ below 70 may classify as mental retardation but a single IQ score alone does not determine this criteria.

 

IQ Classifications in Educational Use

Wechsler, David. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third edition

Psychological Corporation, 1997

Classification IQ Score Percent Included
Theoretical Normal Curve Actual Sample
Very Superior 130 and above 2.2 2.1
Superior 120-129 6.7 8.3
High Average* 110-119 16.1 16.1
Average 90-109 50.0 50.3
Low Average* 80-89 16.1 14.8
Borderline 70-79 6.7 6.5
Extremely Low*  ** 69 and below 2.2 1.9

 

 

 

 

Source: Keys to effective LD practice, University of Tennessee

Deep Breathing



Proper breathing helps your body break away from the “fight or flight” response. When you are stressed, your breath becomes more rapid and shallow. Deep breathing allows the body to return to a state of calmness and delivers oxygen throughout the body as it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system.

Deep breathing is a technique that can be used anywhere and anytime. It is best to practice it in a calm state so that when you are stressed, the technique can be easily implemented.

 

Belly Breathing

  • Lie on your back. Put your hands on your belly.
  • With your mouth closed, breathe in slowly through your nose for a count of 4 as your belly expands.
  • Hold the breath for a count of 2.
  • Slowly exhale the breath though your mouth as your belly retracts.
  • Repeat several times.

 

Making it fun for children

  • Blowing a pinwheel
  • Blowing a feather
  • Blowing bubbles.
  • Placing a stuffed animal on their stomach, while lying down and watching it rise and lower with each breath.
  • Add imagery while inhaling, such as a colorful balloon filling up with air and then letting the air out of the balloon upon exhale.
  • Add a phrase, such as “ breathe in the good, breathe out the bad.”

 

 

5 Tips for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities



Having a learning difference means your child is struggling with skills such as reading, writing, listening, speaking, reasoning or solving math problems. A learning disability does not imply a deficit in intelligence. In fact, most children diagnosed with learning disabilities have average or above average intelligence, they just learn in a different manner.

 

Here are five tips for parents to keep in mind:

 

  1. Find out what your child’s challenges and strengths are. Have your child evaluated to gain a better understanding about the whole child. Make sure you have a clear understanding of your child’s areas of strengths and difficulties. Share this information with your child. Encourage them to use their strengths and assure them that together, you will create tools to overcome their challenges.

 

  1. Find support. Talk to your child’s teacher and school to find out what type of support, remediation and expectations they have. If you cannot find adequate support at school, then you may need to find it outside of school with other parents, groups and professionals who can share learning tips and strategies for kids with learning difficulties.

 

  1. Have reasonable expectations. Know your child’s capabilities and when to push and when to stop. Keep things in perspective. Academics are important but your child’s emotional health and ability to find solutions to daily struggles is even more important. Learning is a lifelong experience; it should be enjoyable.

 

  1. Discover your child’s preferred learning style. Is your child a visual, auditory or kinesthetic learner? Presenting the information in your child’s preferred learning style will allow them to learn and process the way they learn best.

 

  1. Keep the lines of communication open with your child. Take time to listen to your child’s concerns and accomplishments. Remain positive and curious and above all become their biggest cheerleader. As a parent, your support and understanding really matters.

How can parents use behavioral therapy with children?



images (2)Question: How can parents use behavioral therapy with children?

Answer: Behavior therapy involves developing a system of dealing with the child’s behavior to curtail problem behaviors and to increase self-control and compliance. Two techniques are involved: The first aims to increase positive behaviors by identifying the triggers and creating strategies to reduce negative patterns. The second deals with the way adults react to how the child acts and entails creating a set of consequences.

Examples include: ignoring outbursts that seem to beg for attention; listening

and responding to your child’s needs; rewarding positive behavior changes (even if the behavior isn’t perfect); using the right discipline for “wrong” behavior; using the right language when talking about behavior (for example, saying “appropriate” and “inappropriate” instead of “good” and “bad”); and praising the child’s obvious efforts to improve. Most importantly, catch your child being “successful” and praise him for it.

Q&A: What is the best treatment for ADHD?



myths_about_adhdQuestion:  What is the best treatment for ADHD?
Answer: The best treatment for ADHD is a multimodal one which addresses every aspect of the struggle. This may include pursuing multiple actions such as pharmacological treatment, educational interventions, behavioral programs, and psychological therapy. The wellness of the whole self must be addressed: mind, body, and spirit. The best place to start is to make sure the basics are covered: enough sleep, plenty of exercise, good nutrition, a sense of gratitude, and a good support system. Independently, no one of these is likely to lead to significant change but employed collectively, they’ll bring significant improvement.

Q&A: Is there any correlation between IQ and ADHD?



This is the second post from the Q&A session with Therapist Martha Alvarez.

Question: Is there any correlation between IQ and ADHD?

Answer: No. Many people with average, above-average, or below-average intelligence have ADHD. Your child may be smart and manage to ace tests but can still have significant difficulties when it comes to planning and organizational skills, which can affect grades later—especially in high school. Managing ADHD is more about being able to use intelligence in an effective manner.

Q & A :Do people outgrow ADHD?



ADHD symbol design isolated on white backgroundThis post is the first in a series of Q&A’s with Martha about ADHD.

Question:    Do people outgrow ADHD? 

Answer: Not really. However, as children’s brains mature, their symptoms and impairments may change.  They find ways to do life differently so that the challenges caused by ADHD are more manageable and socially acceptable.  A hyper or impulsive child will exhibit their energy much differently than a hyper or impulsive adult will. Whereas a child with ADHD may fidget, act hyper, or interrupt and intrude on others, adults channel their inner restlessness differently, possibly via thrill-seeking behaviors such as driving recklessly, drinking alcohol, or overspending. If left untreated, ADHD can disrupt life, whether the person who has it is a child or an adult.

Why Kids Interrupt and how to handle it



Anger-in-childrenIf you’re a parent, you know how frustrating it is when your child interrupts you. Whether you’re on an important phone call, trying to finish up some computer work, or having a face-to-face conversation with another adult, it often seems like you have an eager child competing for your attention. Why do they do this?

Kids interrupt when they have a need that only we can meet. Maybe they’re hungry or bored or bothered by a sibling. Whatever the reason, your children want you to know that they need your attention. In short, they’re focused on their needs—not yours.

But if you give it a bit of thought, you’ll realize that this demanding behavior doesn’t stem from malice or ill will. Your children are just trying to express themselves and feel that what they have to say matters.

Interruptions can also be a child’s unpolished way of entering a process or situation. When we tell them to be quiet or that we don’t have time, we send the message that their circumstance is not important.

Instead of responding harshly or dismissively, transform the interruption into a teachable moment. Instruct your child about how and when to interrupt; doing so is essential to ending the frustration. Start by giving examples of when it is actually appropriate to interrupt—like when someone is at the door, or, of course, if someone is hurt. Then decide on a gesture or signal (like raising their hand or pointer finger) that they can use to alert you to an important situation. Also decide on—and use—a signal that you’ll use to acknowledge them.

Even if their need to interrupt is actually urgent in nature and really does require your immediate attention, teach your children to remember their manners and to always say “Excuse me” if they are creating an interruption.

When children interrupt, you should always at least make eye contact with them. If their need isn’t pressing, calmly respond by saying, “Give me a minute.” And then make them wait as long as is needed for you to finish your original activity—it’s important that you don’t immediately respond to kids’ non-urgent interruptions, unless you want to reinforce this disruptive behavior.

By all means, give your children the same respect you demand from them. Acknowledge them and let them know that they matter. But also guide them toward patience and forbearance. Doing so will save you years of frustration—but perhaps more importantly, it’ll supply your kids with a critical social skill that will serve them well over the course of their lives.